Zuni Fetish Pot by Edna Leki


This exceptional Edna Leki Zuni Fetish Pot appears in pristine original condition and is arguably the finest example extant. This amazing and rare work by Edna Leki comes from my family's collection and has never appeared on the market since its purchase in 1976.

The pot measures approximately 9.5 inches in diameter by approximately 7 inches in height.

This Fetish Pot is encrusted with the original crushed turquoise and features eight fetishes tied to the sides with leather thongs and four fetishes inside the jar.

The upper four fetishes are water serpents carved from antler bundled with feathers, each with a spiny oyster arrowhead tied with turquoise, coral and heshi beads.

The four water serpent fetishes are substantial in size; the largest measuring 7.25 inches long, one measuring 7 inches long, and two measuring 6.25 inches in length.

The bottom four fetishes are wolves; three are carved in serpentine and one in alabaster. Each measures approximately 4 inches long.

All eight fetishes are in perfect condition and each also appear Edna's distinctive shell arrowhead bundles.

Edna Leki (c. 1924 - 2003) is believed to have been Zuni's first female fetish carver and is the daughter of famed fetish carver and lapidarist Teddy Weahkee. Weahkee became well-known for a style of fetish carving that closely resembles historic Zuni forms and Edna carried on that carving tradition.

She originally worked in channel inlay jewelry, but when her father reached an advanced age, she assisted him in fetish carving; and, thereafter, she devoted herself to carving.

Edna Leki and her father are credited with producing the very first fetish bowls for the commercial market, rather than for ceremonial use. The pots themselves, to which Leki applied crushed turquoise and directional fetishes, were typically made by an Acoma potter.

Pice On Request



Zuni Fetish Pot by Edna Leki
Edna Leki 1976
9.5 x 7 in.   Pottery
Unframed
Dsc_0195
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